MS Global Finance

  • The third module of finance examines corporate finance issues from managerial and strategic perspectives, and extends the concepts covered in the previous two modules to cross-border settings. Topics addressed include: financial and real options; risk management; corporate valuation (domestic and cross-border).

  • The second module of finance picks up where the Fundamentals course leaves off. Topics addressed include: Portfolio theory and the Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM); Weighted Average Cost of Capital; capital structure theories (including agency/signaling theories and dividend policy); financial market efficiency and its implications

  • This course covers the application of accounting models to the measurement of assets, liabilities and stockholders? equity. Topic covered include marketable securities, receivable and inventory valuation, fixed and intangible assets, bonds, leases, dividends, stock buybacks, stock splits and foreign currency translation. The emphasis of the course is on the evaluation of corporate financial reporting policy and the usefulness of financial reports for decision making. U.S. and international accounting standards are covered.

  • This course emphasizes the use of the target language in context, especially the lexicon of business. Readings from newspapers, journals, and books (although to a restricted degree in non-Latin alphabet languages) familiarize future international managers with issues in the areas of the world where the target language is spoken. Activities include small group discussions, oral and written projects, and grammar review.

  • In Fundamentals II major emphasis continues to be on the development of speaking and listening proficiency, but increased attention is also given to reading and writing. Authentic materials in the target language reflect situations
    relevant to the international manager, except for non-Latin based languages or Asian languages.

  • Fundamentals I is intensive and emphasizes interactive activities that develop oral proficiency. Participants study the four communicative skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing)with emphasis on the development of oral interaction. The use
    of a cassette player may be required. Classes meet four times a week.

  • This course is a continuation of Fundamentals I and II. It aims to help students further develop communicative skills in listening and speaking, with an additional emphasis on reading texts. The emphases of this course are: a) building up more vocabulary and grammatical structures for communications purposes, b) integrating the linguistic and cultural knowledge acquired in Fundamentals I and II with the new knowledge, c) introducing business content and terminology in instructions and activities.

  • This is an introductory course for beginning language learners. No prior knowledge is required. Students study language fundamentals such as pronunciations, vocabulary and grammar. The emphases are: a) establishing a solid foundation in pronunciations; b) building up vocabulary and sentence patterns in communicative contexts; c) introducing writing systems and preparing students to read characters. In addition, cultural and social information that go along with language use are also included in the teaching.

  • The learning program of this internship is largely supported by the sponsoring organization with some faculty involvement. Since academic credit is granted, it is required for the student to coordinate with the Faculty Advisor who facilitates the learning process throughout the internship. The student must discuss with the Faculty Advisor, regarding the academic paper (minimum 4-5 pages of a special internship topic) and the progress of the work during the internship (at least one session during the trimester).

  • The learning program of this internship is largely supported by the sponsoring organization with some faculty involvement. Since academic credit is granted, it is required for the student to coordinate with the Faculty Advisor who facilitates the learning process throughout the internship. The student must discuss with the Faculty Advisor, regarding the academic paper (minimum 4-5 pages of a special internship topic) and the progress of the work during the internship (at least one session during the trimester).

Pages