MA Global Affairs and Management

  • This course investigates, from the business manager?s perspective, the determination of exchange rates, the nature of foreign exchange markets and hedging instruments; international financial markets and the transmission of funds between countries; alternative international monetary arrangements and institutions; balance of payments analysis; the respective economic consequence in response to monetary, fiscal and exchange rate policy changes. The course also analyzes conditions for successful growth and the causes and risks of economic crisis.

  • This course covers fundamentals of the global political economy including (1) major conceptual frameworks for understanding the linkages between international politics and international economics; (2) key issue areas such as international monetary and financial relations, international trade, foreign investment and transnational enterprises, and North-South relations; and (3) analysis of key international economic institutions such as the International Monetary Fund, World Trade Organization, and World Bank.

  • In recent years, the business world has become increasingly sensitized to the presence of institutional governance and defining the culture of a corporation and its core values. Stated explicitly or not, these issues not only impact the reputation of the venture or corporation, but also its sustainability and financial bottom line.

  • This course focuses on developing competitive advantage by creating customer value. An understanding of customer relationships and their strategic implications is developed within the context of competitor and value-chain relationships. Emphasis is placed on developing an understanding of the analytical and managerial decision tools for creating competitive advantage, and on understanding the similarities and the differences in domestic and global marketing.

  • This course introduces basic statistical concepts and their application in the business world. The course starts with the use of descriptive statistics to summarize data. Next, the basic concepts of probability are examined. The course then moves on to consider sampling and statistical inference. The final topic is an introduction to the use of simple linear regression analysis to model relationships between variables. The course material is approached from an applied perspective, with extensive use of business examples to illustrate the concepts.

  • As we take the first steps in a networked economy, the transformation of our ways of doing business has become profound. The World Wide Web, MP3 compression, digital interactive television, wireless communication, video streaming, podcasting, video sharing, thin computing, and social networks are redefining the ways we interact with customers and manage market(ing) relationships.

  • The goal of this course is to offer a variety of opportunities for students to learn about social entrepreneurship and engage students in learning the contributors to high-performing social enterprises. Students will explore stories of established environmental and social enterprises through books and case studies to uncover common themes and approaches. In addition, students will engage in class discussion for full emersion into the mindset of socially oriented businesses and activities.

  • This course focuses on marketing planning and implementation. It develops a practical knowledge of the marketing management system and its key components, including marketing planning, control and coordination, integrated marketing communications, product development, pricing and distribution channels. Emphasis is placed on developing skills for entering new markets and sustaining or growing current markets.

  • This is an introductory course for beginning language learners. No prior knowledge is required. Students study language fundamentals such as pronunciations, vocabulary and grammar. The emphases are: a) establishing a solid foundation in pronunciations; b) building up vocabulary and sentence patterns in communicative contexts; c) introducing writing systems and preparing students to read characters. In addition, cultural and social information that go along with language use are also included in the teaching.

  • This course emphasizes the use of the target language in context, especially the lexicon of business. Readings from newspapers, journals, and books (although to a restricted degree in non-Latin alphabet languages) familiarize future international managers with issues in the areas of the world where the target language is spoken. Activities include small group discussions, oral and written projects, and grammar review.

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