Executive MBA US

  • This course offers an introduction to the fundamentals of the international business environment and its three major aspects: (1) the institutional framework and policy management of international economic relations, (2) risk assessment and strategic analysis of nation-states, and (3) the operational and organizational concerns of the transnational enterprise.

  • This course covers the development and use of managerial accounting information, including both financial and non-financial performance measures, in making long- and short-run decisions. Topics include cost-profit volume analysis, cost behavior, relevant costs, job-order and processes costing, activity-based costing, product profitability, customer profitability, balanced scorecard, variance analysis, and transfer pricing.

  • Cross-cultural communications provides a framework of models and skills for communication

  • This course will focus on the introduction of negotiating in the global context. Students will participate in a variety of hands on activities, such as scenario-driven discussions, case study and student-to-student negotiation.

  • The second module of Finance picks up where the Financial Management course leaves off. It examines corporate finance issues from managerial and strategic perspectives, and extends the concepts covered in the previous module to cross-border settings. Topics addressed include: financial derivatives such as options, forwards and futures; real options; foreign exchange risk management; and cross border valuation.

  • This course investigates the nature of foreign exchange markets and hedging instruments; international financial markets and the transmission of funds; balance of payments; alternative international monetary arrangements and institutions; and the respective adjustment mechanisms in response to fiscal and monetary policy changes. The course also examines how countries grow successfully and the causes of economic crisis.

  • In recent years, the business world has become increasingly sensitized to the presence of institutional governance and defining the culture of a corporation and its core values. Stated explicitly or not, these issues not only impact the reputation of the venture or corporation, but also its sustainability and financial bottom line.

  • This is an introductory course for beginning language learners. No prior knowledge is required. Students study language fundamentals such as pronunciations, vocabulary and grammar. The emphases are: a) establishing a solid foundation in pronunciations; b) building up vocabulary and sentence patterns in communicative contexts; c) introducing writing systems and preparing students to read characters. In addition, cultural and social information that go along with language use are also included in the teaching.

  • This course is a continuation of Fundamentals I and II. It aims to help students further develop communicative skills in listening and speaking, with an additional emphasis on reading texts. The emphases of this course are: a) building up more vocabulary and grammatical structures for communications purposes, b) integrating the linguistic and cultural knowledge acquired in Fundamentals I and II with the new knowledge, c) introducing business content and terminology in instructions and activities.

  • In recent years, the business world has become increasingly sensitized to the presence of institutional governance and defining the culture of a corporation and its core values. Stated explicitly or not, these issues not only impact the reputation of the venture or corporation, but also its sustainability and financial bottom line.

Pages