Blog

  • Aug 21, 2012
    Ford

    A corporate strategy article by Thunderbird students By Anne Campeau, Elizabeth Clark, Jay Jacobsmuhlen, Kyle Scott and Chad Winters

    The future of the automobile clearly does not favor the traditional combustible engine. Can Ford adjust and prosper in the new global green environment?


  • Aug 20, 2012
    BP

    A corporate strategy article by Thunderbird students Timothy Houston, Timothy Mayberry, Adam Yestrepsky, Matthew Allred and Bhawin Khanna

    The changing environment of the upstream crude oil procurement industry and recent catastrophic accidents have created numerous issues for British Petroleum (BP). International oil companies such as BP face the challenge of entering markets which are dominated by national oil companies that receive subsidies from local governments and beneficial treatments. BP also has a tarnished public reputation driven by the Deepwater Horizon gulf oil spill, which makes global and domestic operation even more difficult. The recent disasters within the oil procurement industry also have driven tighter environmental regulations that require new approaches and techniques to crude oil isolation. BP has developed a comprehensive program to tackle these new hurdles for its upstream oil procurement division. This plan is known as “Project 20K” and involves new technology, unique approaches to regulations, and new business strategies.


  • Aug 19, 2012
    Southwest Airlines

    A study of the current and future state of growth and acquisition strategy, by Thunderbird students Manash Banerjee, Owen Chen, Chris Hardesty, William Keller and Dustin Ward

    “If the Wright Brothers were alive today, Wilbur would have to fight Orville to reduce costs.” — Herb Kelleher, founder of Southwest Airlines

    Southwest Airlines (SWA) transports more passengers (101M) than any other US carrier while maintaining an 80%+ on-time performance rate. Further, SWA recorded its 39th consecutive year of profitability1 – a remarkable accomplishment for a company that previously did not fly outside of Texas and especially considering the general turmoil and collapse of the airline industry as a whole. SWA is known for its committed approach to short-haul, point-to-point service with “no frills”. Nevertheless, the question for the future is – how can SWA continue its low-cost advantages and current operational strategy to achieve successful growth targets? In other words, where is the next blue sky for SWA?

    Strategic Challenges for SWA in the Current State


  • Aug 19, 2012
    Caterpillar

    A corporate strategy article by Thunderbird students Shen-Chun Lin, Aimee DeGrauwe, Eli Darby, Monica Willbrand, Raymond Caruso and James Moore

    CSR: The Reputation Necessity


  • Aug 19, 2012
    Embraer

    A corporate strategy article by Thunderbird students Mitch Epstein, Chad Bonfiglio, Trudy Sharp, Edgar Khachatryan and Alyssa Watt

    Embraer, a Brazilian aircraft manufacturing company, flew into a lead role in the regional jet industry. With a tagline of “For the Journey,” Embraer faces significant pressure and competition.  In order to maintain and extend its lead in the industry, Embraer will have to build on its unique history and push harder and deeper into strategic relationships and innovations.

    National Champion

    Embraer’s unique relationship with the Brazilian government has positioned the company well to continue pursuing its lead in the regional aircraft market.  When the Brazilian government was looking for a national champion in the late 1960s, in the airplane manufacturing sector, it created its own “mixed enterprise.”  Created in 1969 as a joint venture, shareholders and the Brazilian government formed Empresa Brasileira de Aeronáutica, better known as EMBRAER.


  • Aug 19, 2012
    Boeing

    A look into the turbulent flight path that lies ahead, by Thunderbird students Alexander Espiritu, Robert Grimes, Carlos Flores, Brian Long and Arturo Furones Seco

    As one of the two giants in the commercial aircraft industry, Boeing Commercial Airplanes (BCA) currently dominates a significant portion of the commercial aircraft market.  However, as that market continues to evolve, BCA faces a number of critical strategic issues; how the company chooses to deal with them will determine whether or not the company succeeds in maintaining a tight hold on its market share and future profits.  Amongst these strategic issues, the most serious challenges to BCA’s future operations are the new entry of additional competitors to the industry, supplier and partnership relationships, and relations between the company and its labor force.


  • Aug 19, 2012
    Crystal Ball

    A corporate strategy article by Thunderbird students A. Andrikopoulos, L. Del Bianco, S. Golliher, I. Perez and K. Singh

    As the movie rental industry evolves, what’s next for movie rental kiosks?

    How many Americans have never seen a movie with a crystal ball or some tea leaves? Movies are replete with clairvoyant seers peering into the future. Harry Potter’s Professor Trelawney predicts the eventual demise of Voldemort or Harry. Precogs in the Minority Report have visions of crimes before they happen. Sandra Bullock’s character in Premonition is forewarned of her husband’s imminent death with lifelike visions. The companies that rent these same movies could certainly use such tools and talents to fully understand the future of the movie rental industry which has drastically changed in the last few years with the advent of recent technological advances for online streaming.


  • Aug 06, 2012
    google

    A corporate strategy article by Thunderbird students Eric Chown, Mike Grey, Nicholas Kincaid, Steve McCaa, Charles Midthun and Srikanth Venkatasubramanian


  • Aug 05, 2012
    coca-cola

    The recent decision of India’s parliament to allow 100 percent foreign ownership of companies in India is big news to many multinationals that have been dying to get in on the action in the world’s second most populous market, and the massive Coca-Cola Company is no exception. Indeed, with a full re-entry to the country it abandoned in the late 1970s, there’s essentially no corner of the world that will now be without the seemingly ubiquitous white-on-red script of the most successful soft drink in history. But one other major region has given Coke headaches since at least the early 1960s, and going there today one might be hard pressed to find the classic can for sale. Indeed, Coca-Cola has faced a number of challenges in the Middle East, but learning how to turn them into opportunities there could teach the soft drink giant some important lessons it will need for success in India.

    Issues with Israel


  • Aug 05, 2012
    Boeing

    A corporate strategy article by Thunderbird students  Amanda Bhatia, David Freeman, David Wilson, Geoffrey Christanday, Jennifer Mousseau and Matthew Larson

    As China’s economy develops, so do the prospective opportunities for foreign firms eager to sell their goods and services to these new Chinese customers.  However, many multinational corporations have already tried and failed – and yet – what makes these MNC’s keep coming back?


  • Aug 05, 2012
    Best Buy

    A corporate strategy article by Thunderbird students Ahmed, Farrow, Goosen, Jones, Kortgard and Turra

    Are the days of big box consumer electronics retailers coming to an end, or can Best Buy prove it has what it takes to adapt and compete in a changing global marketplace?


  • Aug 05, 2012
    Anheuser-Busch InBev

    A corporate strategy article by Thunderbird students Andrea Bly, Sangeetha Nagaratnam, Joseph Rosing, David Roudybush and William Todd

    Can, or even should, the global leader in brewing take on the numerous craft beer companies, whose sole focus is on satisfying the unique tastes of their local customers?

    Blame the Carmel Macchiato. Or maybe the Mocha Frappuccino. I am not sure exactly when the tipping point struck, but at some time post-millennium, the U.S. society morphed into an environment where consumers attempt to display individualism through their sophisticated and differentiated purchases. Accordingly, companies were anxious to provide expanded and unique assortment to meet the evolving consumer demand. Starbucks now has 87,000 different combinations of drinks, which dwarfs the 31 flavors of Baskin Robbins that offered significant variety for many generations of Americans. [1]


  • Aug 05, 2012
    Blackberry

    As mobile technology has made leaps and bounds, Research in Motion (RIM) maker of the once popular Blackberry mobile phone struggles to survive. Can the company save itself from bankruptcy or is it too late?

    Turned off…
    Thorsten Heins, the new CEO of Research In Motion (RIM) probably cancelled his subscription to the New York Times. One of the United States’ leading daily papers decided to drop its app for BlackBerry after seeing a notable drop off in user traffic on its app. The app will no longer load news stories, essentially turning off. This follows a series of unflattering developments regarding the maker of the once dominant mobile phone brand BlackBerry. Large multinational companies such as Halliburton and Qantas recently decided to no longer use BlackBerry services and have been switching their employees to Apple’s iPhone. The US Government’s procurement agency has also followed suit, starting the switch from BlackBerry to iPhone for all US Government Agencies..(1) (2)


  • Aug 04, 2012
    vodafone

    A corporate strategy article by Thunderbird students Edyette Key, Kara Nguyen, Cole Augustine, Ilan Fehler, Giff Bloom and F. Trevor Rogers

    Economies and industries go through periods of consolidation; from the bust of the .coms, recent restructuring of the banks and even the funneling of the beer industry. In some cases these consolidations aren’t because the biggest player in the market is gobbling up all the little ones, but rather the lean and agile end up with more capital and are able to buy into a controlling position of a much bigger and strapped for cash giant. One such example is the acquisition of miller brewing company by the South African Brewery that has propelled SAB to be one of the top three breweries in the world. The communications industry is no different and many companies seek to enter new markets through acquisition. This article dissects the motivations of Vodafone’s further acquisition of Verizon and its potential to weaken Vodafone’s current global growth momentum.


  • Aug 03, 2012

    razor

    To Shave or Not to Shave

    Like most men around the world, Prakash, a thirty-year-old Indian port worker wakes up in the morning facing the unpleasant but necessary task of having to shave. But unlike most men in the developed world, for Prakash shaving means sitting on the floor with a small amount of still water, balancing a hand-held mirror in low light, and experiencing frequent nicks and cuts from his double-edged razor[1].


  • Apr 23, 2012

    angola2A research paper by Thunderbird students Christian Lorentzen and Anthony Petrunin


  • Apr 18, 2012
    okcupid-match

    A corporate marketing article by Thunderbird students Noah Emery, Kate Gillette, Megan Groves, Roger Li, Christian Lorentzen, Ullas Rameshappa and Amanda Roberson

    Executive Summary: In this paper, we will provide an overview of the existing and growing online dating market as it pertains to the United States. Focusing on two brands, Match.com (Match) and OkCupid, we will explore options for Interactive Corporation, the holding company for both dating sites, to simultaneously grow the online dating market and increase visibility and profitability of newly acquired OkCupid, a much younger brand. After analysis of product, promotion, placement and pricing as well as segmentation, targeting and positioning of each brand, we recommend the following: a dual-branding strategy that capitalizes on Match’s industry experience in order to grow the market and maximize OkCupid’s potential value.


  • Apr 16, 2012
    China counterfeits

    A corporate strategy article by Thunderbird students David Curtis, Merissa Gordon, Kori Joneson, Emily Mahoney, and Robert Thompson


  • Apr 16, 2012
    Apple

    A corporate strategy article by Thunderbird students.

    With $100 billion in cash and closing in on the richest market cap in history, many feel that Apple is at the top of its game.[i] Nevertheless, at some point, Apple’s products will reach saturation levels at the high-end of the market in developed countries.  To keep the top spot, Apple will need to direct its growth efforts to emerging markets and find ways to make its products both relevant and widely available to customers outside of its traditional target markets.


  • Apr 16, 2012
    Groupon

    A corporate strategy article by Thunderbird students.

    In 1887, Mr. Asa Candler was faced with a distribution dilemma. [1] The Atlanta druggist had spent $2,500 on a formula for a sweet-tasting drink and was looking for a way to promote the sale of this little-known beverage named Coca-Cola. [2] His solution: handwritten tickets offering customers a free sample. To Mr. Candler’s surprise, the offer was a huge success. So was born the coupon. By 1913, an estimated 11% or roughly 8.5 million Americans had received a free coke. [1] One could argue that Mr. Candler’s invention of the coupon is the reason Coca-Cola started on its path to becoming one of the most iconic global brands - ever.


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