October 2012

Oct 31, 2012

By Karen S. Walch, Ph.D.

Thucydides in 400 BC wrote in the Peloponnesian War that Pausanias, a Spartan, lost his status and power within his own ranks because of his lack of cultural awareness. In Pausanias’ case, he “went native” by falling in love with and flaunting the joys he found in Persian culture and luxury. Pausanias held his own native Greek culture of simplicity and discipline in distain. In classic laws of power, this outward infatuation with the foreign and disregard for one’s own national culture is offensive and subject to punishment.

Oct 30, 2012

By Karen S. Walch, Ph.D.

When Sun-Tzu espoused The Art of War in the fourth century B.C, and Niccolo Machiavelli produced “The Prince” as a framework for the laws of power in the 16th century, an entire nation would be ruled by only one king or emperor. Courtiers, military officers and ministers would fiercely compete with each other for access to limited elite economic, political and social resources. The competition for power often became a vicious battle of all-or-nothing wins and losses. This week we will address the fact that over the centuries, power has gradually become democratized and much more diffused.

Oct 29, 2012

By Karen S. Walch, Ph.D.

Oct 22, 2012

By Karen S. Walch, Ph.D.

Oct 17, 2012

Thunderbird Professor Dr. John Mathis speaks about the significance of negotiation in the world of Finance.

Welcome to this series of podcasts on Global Negotiations. In this second podcast of the series, Thunderbird faculty of Finance, Dr. John Mathis speaks about his experiences in financial negotiations. If you would like to see the video for this podcast, please visit http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W7ZSAKmrS3Y&feature=relmfu

Oct 15, 2012

By Karen S. Walch, Ph.D.

Oct 08, 2012

By Karen S. Walch, Ph.D.

Oct 02, 2012

Based on the first video of the podcast series, how important is the role of cross cultural communication in negotiations?

Oct 01, 2012

By Karen S. Walch, Ph.D.