Redbox

  • RedboxA corporate strategy article by Thunderbird students Cole Augustine, Cynthia Austin, Bradley Carson, and Jennifer Long

    Redbox has seen a meteoric rise to the top of the movie rental business, despite their focus on a dying form of media. As the company's built in expiration date draws closer, Redbox must ask itself, "What Now?" This article will provide an overview of how Redbox got to the top, a preview into the future of the video rental industry, and suggestions for how Redbox can stay relevant in a changing industry.

    In the midst of huge losses amongst video rental companies such as Blockbuster and Hollywood Video, Redbox emerged as an innovator by targeting a low price strategy and partnering with other companies known for value to increase volume. Originally a subsidiary of McDonald’s, Redbox entered the market with $1 DVD rental kiosks in many high traffic McDonald’s locations. The Redbox $1 DVD rental price point aligned well to the low income McDonald’s target market, and paying per DVD rental (transaction-based pricing) reinforced the low priced model, translating consumer spending directly to consumption (rather than a subscription-based pricing model where the consumer pays regardless of consumption).

  • Redbox global strategyBy Jones Dias, Abhinav Kant, Vamsi Kothapalli, Kristal Nicholson, Filippo Sclafani and Pankaj Tamrakar

    As recently as four years ago, almost no one would have been aware of what the word Redbox meant. Today, Americans have become devoted customers of this rising star of the impulse DVD rental industry. But will the fun and ease of Redbox’s unique impulse proposition last through the next decade? Do advances in technology, with an ever-changing array of readily available options, such as downloads or streaming, mean that the days of the Redbox are numbered?

    The discussion seems to vary as to which strategy Redbox needs to take in order to continue to thrive in the rental business. Coinstar (Redbox’ parent) CEO Paul Davis, expressing his ideas in a recent conference call, considers streaming a "significant opportunity" while maintaining that he foresees a "long, profitable life ahead" for Redbox's movie-machine kiosk business.