Cole Augustine

  • vodafoneA corporate strategy article by Thunderbird students Edyette Key, Kara Nguyen, Cole Augustine, Ilan Fehler, Giff Bloom and F. Trevor Rogers

    Economies and industries go through periods of consolidation; from the bust of the .coms, recent restructuring of the banks and even the funneling of the beer industry. In some cases these consolidations aren’t because the biggest player in the market is gobbling up all the little ones, but rather the lean and agile end up with more capital and are able to buy into a controlling position of a much bigger and strapped for cash giant. One such example is the acquisition of miller brewing company by the South African Brewery that has propelled SAB to be one of the top three breweries in the world. The communications industry is no different and many companies seek to enter new markets through acquisition. This article dissects the motivations of Vodafone’s further acquisition of Verizon and its potential to weaken Vodafone’s current global growth momentum.

  • RedboxA corporate strategy article by Thunderbird students Cole Augustine, Cynthia Austin, Bradley Carson, and Jennifer Long

    Redbox has seen a meteoric rise to the top of the movie rental business, despite their focus on a dying form of media. As the company's built in expiration date draws closer, Redbox must ask itself, "What Now?" This article will provide an overview of how Redbox got to the top, a preview into the future of the video rental industry, and suggestions for how Redbox can stay relevant in a changing industry.

    In the midst of huge losses amongst video rental companies such as Blockbuster and Hollywood Video, Redbox emerged as an innovator by targeting a low price strategy and partnering with other companies known for value to increase volume. Originally a subsidiary of McDonald’s, Redbox entered the market with $1 DVD rental kiosks in many high traffic McDonald’s locations. The Redbox $1 DVD rental price point aligned well to the low income McDonald’s target market, and paying per DVD rental (transaction-based pricing) reinforced the low priced model, translating consumer spending directly to consumption (rather than a subscription-based pricing model where the consumer pays regardless of consumption).